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URSP and USTF recipient Kelsey Rivers & mentor Anna Pollack presented their longevity research Friday, November 11,2016

URSP and USTF recipient Kelsey Rivers & mentor Anna Pollack presented their longevity research

The researchers looked at the genetic material inside the women's cells, specifically the length of their telomeres. These are caps on the ends of chromosomes that protect the chromosomes from damage. Telomeres naturally shorten as people age, but the structures don't shorten at the same rate in every person. The longer a person's telomeres are, the more times their cells could hypothetically still divide, research has shown. Thus, telomeres are considered a marker of biological age — that is, the age of a person's cells, rather than the individual's chronological age.

 

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URSP and USTF recipient Kelsey Rivers & mentor Anna Pollack presented their longevity research

URSP and USTF recipient Kelsey Rivers & mentor Anna Pollack presented their longevity research

Friday, November 11, 2016

Women who give birth may be biologically "older" than women who don't, a new study suggests. For the study, the researchers analyzed information from 1,556 U.S. women ages 20 to 44 who took part in a national survey from 1999 to 2002, which involved giving blood samples.

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